Category Archives: Photography

Sunday Scenes: November 16, 2014

golden

“I sang of leaves, of leaves of gold, and leaves of gold there grew:
Of wind I sang, a wind there came and in the branches blew.
Beyond the Sun, beyond the Moon, the foam was on the Sea,
And by the strand of Ilmarin there grew a Golden Tree.”
J.R.R. Tolkien

lines

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Sunday Scenes: November 2, 2014

fall2

Not only does the local library offer an amazing plethora of books to peruse, but it also offers a wonderful autumn view, as one walks towards it from the parking lot.

library

I am currently reading We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves: A Novel, checked out through the library’s e-media section.

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Women of the Wall

ark4

Women of the Wall Read from a Torah Scroll at the Western Wall- the full story, here.
1:14 AM – 24 Oct 2014

Not only that, but: “The group also conducted a Mat Mitzvah, or Jewish coming of age ritual for girls that is also banned at the wall, for 12-year–old Tammy Gotlib. “There is no reason this should not go on every day. It didn’t bother anyone and meant a lot to Tammy and her family,” Spure added. Officials from the Wailing Wall rabbinical authority were not immediately available for comment.”

Shabbat Shalom!

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Caldron Cooking

frogs

Song of the Witches: “Double, double toil and trouble”
By William Shakespeare

(from Macbeth)
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and caldron bubble.
Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the caldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt and toe of frog,
Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting,
Lizard’s leg and howlet’s wing,
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and caldron bubble.
Cool it with a baboon’s blood,
Then the charm is firm and good.

turtle

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Speaking of Huts…

hut1

Wondering off the beaten path at the lake, I came across two distinct hut-like structures. I often wonder about those oddities that one finds in unexpected places.

Was it built to keep the heat of the sun off of the person who built it? Or, possibly it was built because rain was expected, and there was a homeless person/s living inside it, at one point. Maybe a family had a picnic and thought it would be fun to sit within a hut.

hut2

Speaking of huts, Sukkot, or the Feast of the Booths or Tabernacles, begins the evening of October 8th, and ends the evening of October 15th. It is one of Judaism’s Three Pilgrimage Festivals.

It is a season of harvest, and a season of remembrance. The Israelites dwelt in these types of temporary dwellings during their 40 years of journeying through the desert. Let us remember their hardships and obstacles that they forged through. Agricultural workers also dwelt in this type of temporary dwelling during harvest season.

Jews celebrate Sukkot by eating inside a sukkah (hut, tent) for eight days (seven in Israel). All meals are supposed to be taken inside of it. Read about its history, here.

The sukkah is built with four species of plants:

etrog (אתרוג) – the fruit of a citron tree
lulav (לולב) – a ripe, green, closed frond from a date palm tree
hadass (הדס) – boughs with leaves from the myrtle tree
aravah (ערבה) – branches with leaves from the willow tree

You can read more about the custom/s here.

wood-shelter

The House on the Roof: A Sukkot Story, by David Adler, is a great children’s book. The story is a wonderful example of Jewish tradition versus religious tolerance, and it is based on an actual happening.

Chag Sameach!

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Faith, Bridges, Connections

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Bridges are connections, overpasses, passages over obstacles that take us from one side to another. They are also a spiritual symbol, leading us on a journey across a divide or an obstacle, that could connect us to faith and religion.

At times the bridge comes to an end, with no way to walk on any further, and one must turn around and retrace their steps, leading them ponder the paths they must bridge, or think about reconnecting with community, religion or family.

Faith builds a bridge from this world to the next. – Unknown Author

I like the poem below, by Emily Dickinson

Faith — is the Pierless Bridge
Supporting what We see
Unto the Scene that We do not –
Too slender for the eye

It bears the Soul as bold
As it were rocked in Steel
With Arms of Steel at either side –
It joins — behind the Veil

To what, could We presume
The Bridge would cease to be
To Our far, vacillating Feet
A first Necessity.

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