Category Archives: Uncategorized

Time Flies

monterey 7 25 14

Time flies when you are having fun. And, fun I had, up visiting my brother and sister-in-law, who live on the Monterey Peninsula, in Pacific Grove, CA.

beach side

I intentionally chose not to blog. I wanted to enjoy the time spent with family members, enjoying hiking, lighthouse touring, aquarium exhibits, eating, walking along the beach, laughing, and creating fun memories.

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Remember…

yarz

This act is so incomprehensible.

Remember the three teenaged boys…

Naftali Fraenkel
Gil-ad Shaar
Eyal Yifrach

Remember their families.

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Skirball Cultural Center

The Skirball Cultural Center in Beverly Hills, CA, is a place I frequently visit. I go there for special events, exhibits, and to just feel surrounded by an atmosphere devoted to Jewish history and cultural arts.

This is the front entrance to the Skirball.

Near the front entrance.

The pathway to the parking lot as you exit the Skirball.

For updates on upcoming exhibits, events, etc., visit their website.

All photography is my copyright and may not be reproduced without my express permission.

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Filed under Holocaust/Genocide, Jewish History, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Uncategorized

Sunday Scenes: Sir Nicholas Winton

Over twenty five years ago, on That’s Life, a BBC TV show, Sir Nicholas Winton was surprised by some of the Holocaust Survivors he helped save, and their extended families. If this video does not make you teary-eyed, I have no idea what will. I have watched it numerous times since I first saw it, a few months back.

nickfam This morning, I have the privilege of a seeing the documentary film, “Nicky’s Family“. I am a member of the movie theater’s “Sneak Preview Club”, and am attending a free screening. I am already feeling emotional, knowing about Sir Nicholas Winton’s story incredible. Since first seeing the BBC video, I have researched him and have become educated as to how he saved children from concentration camps and/or possible death, in what is known as the Czech Kindertransport.

Sir Nicholas Winton was responsible for saving 669 children! Imagine… And, his humbleness kept him from revealing his actions, his immense humanitarian efforts. Nobody in his family knew about his accomplishments, until his wife found his detailed scrapbook in 1988.

It contained lists of the children, including their parents’ names, and the names and addresses of the families that took them in. By sending letters to these addresses, 80 of “Winton’s children” were found in Britain.” (Wikipedia)

For him it was a responsibility, an obligation to humankind. His actions weren’t put forth in order to gain recognition. He accomplished what he did, and that was that.

His 105th birthday is May 19, 2014!

Below are some links that will educate you regarding Sir Nicholas Winton and his story:

Nicholas Winton, Wikipedia

BBC News Premiere Re Nicholas Winton

ADL honors Nicholas Winton

Interview with Sir Nicholas Winton July 2013

Sir Nicholas Winton honored in U.S.

The Power of Good: The Nicholas Winton Story

I will most likely update this, after seeing the film.

Update: The film was extremely poignant and inspiring. Sir Nicholas Winton’s story touched millions all over the world, and encouraged them to contribute to humanity’s willingness to help others, no matter their cultural background.

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Filed under Films, Holocaust/Genocide, Jewish History, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Uncategorized

Sunday Scenes on Tuesday

cherry blossoms2

I walked along the lake, Sunday, and I took some photos of the cherry trees.

cherry blossoms3

A few of the trees are in full bloom, as the capture above shows two that are.

two benches

Some of the trees are still trying to illuminate the scene with about 25-35%, or more, of their blossoms still closed.

cherry blossoms1

It was a beautiful day for walking within nature, soaking in the sun’s rays, and looking at the beautiful pinkness of the blossoms and the blueness of the lake.

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Book Review: The Free World

thefreeworld

The Free World, by David Bezmozgis, is a captivating novel that entails the emigration of Latvian and Soviet Jews, specifically during the late 1970s, when some were permitted to leave. In 1978 the Krasnansky family has decided to leave, and their journey takes them to Rome, where they must wait for visas to continue on to the United States, or possibly Canada.

The elder Samuil Krasnansky is a diehard communist, and decorated war hero for his service while in the Red Army. The Russian Revolution had a profound affect on him, and the effects of war continued to define his life until his death. Emma, his wife, is also there, as are their two sons, Alec and Karl. The two brothers, are as different as they can be in their political and social spheres.

Alec is a roamer, a womanizer, married to Polina. He seemingly cares little about the circumstances surrounding their journey. Karl, on the other hand is a staunch capitalist, ever involved within the circle of individuals he encounters in Rome. Life is not always as it seems for the two of them. Through some humorous twists of fate, Alec feels he is being pursued by female interests, when in fact it turns out to be otherwise.

There are other laugh-out-loud lines and scenarious within the pages, such as Samuil’s reaction to a rendering of Fiddler on the Roof. Yet, withing the comic relief, the story line is one wrought with varied ideals, and varied perspectives of freedom, and what it actually means. Bezmozgis is brilliant in depicting the mindsets of the characters.

I didn’t necessarily like the characters, and found them to be flawed in many aspects. But, I still enjoyed reading The Free World, for its historical factor, and for how the author depicted the lives of the individuals. We are all a part of the whole, no matter our choices, our mindsets and our differences. We are all flawed, and no one individual is perfect in the scheme of things.

Due to Samuil’s health, the family is forced to stay in Rome longer than expected. Their visas are on the line during this time period. Their freedom to journey forward, physically, is hindered by his health. Yes, they could have forged forward, and he could have emigrated at a later point in time, but the familial hold was a strong one, despite the disparities and lack of similarities within the family members. This aspect is strong throughout the pages.

The story line reflects back and forth, and there are back stories of each of the characters. The book spans decades of familial uprising and social standings. The decades infuse the dynamics of revolution and war quite vividly. This brings into focus why they act the way they do, and also gives the reader a sense of their lives before departing for Rome, and the choices they made beforehand.

The roller coaster ride the family finds themselves on only enhances their feelings of suffocation in a city that they were supposed to be temporarily involved in, waiting for the chance to leave. Freedom takes on new meanings, from emotional stifling to physical stand stills. Their wait for visa approval is filled with frustration and the unknown.

The book had me questioning the defining of freedom and the “the free world”. Is there such a place on the planet where a person can be truly free? Does “the free world” exist, or is it just a euphemism for the areas that were located outside of the realm of the communist states. One might live a life in a non-communist environment, but does that mean they are free? Freedom takes on many forms, not the least being emotional constraints.

Before reading this book, I had no idea that there was a “way station” so to speak, in Rome, where emigres had to wait for visas. The daily interactions and emotional aspects of the waiting period is highly illuminated within the pages. The emotional struggles are brought to the forefront.

The Free World, by David Bezmozgis, is a well-formed study and metaphor for freedom and autonomy, within familial dynamics. The visuals are strong, as are the insights into the emotions of the characters. The historical aspect is an important one, in my opinion.

I would rate The Free World a 4 with 5 being the highest.

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Filed under Book Reviews, Historical Fiction, Jewish Immigrant, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Novels, Uncategorized, World History