Tag Archives: america immigrant experience

Lorri M. Book Review: The Provider

the provider2 The Provider, by Evelyn R. Marshall, is an extremely insightful novel, filled with much to ponder.

Rosa Galperin, a nineteen-year old who has emigrated from Russia. She was chosen out of all of her siblings to live in Chicago with her aunt and aunt’s family, a family whose children constantly mock Rosa and make fun of her aspirations.

Rosa is filled with dreams, the typical immigrant dream of getting rich. But, along with that dream she also desires something else, something that her family members and friends can not understand. She desires love.

While others strive to find a man who is an excellent financial provider, Rosa strives not only for that, but also for love. She will work hard to succeed, but within that environment, she needs the emotional attachments.

Along comes Sanya Voronov, much to the dismay of her family. They can not understand her affection and attachment to him. He has nothing as far as financial stability, but he adores and loves Rosa. He will strive to provide the monetary comforts that she yearns for. But, with each new endeavor, he falls and his status, in the eyes of Rosa’s friends and family, is diminished. She is the one who is constantly working and providing the funds necessary for their survival.

Sanya wants to be successful, but with each undertaking something occurs that causes him to fail. Many of the men in his life admire his conviction to try his hand at what he wants to do, even with his failures. The women in Rosa’s life do not comprehend why Rosa stays with him through thick and thin.

Marshall is masterful in encompassing the eras in the novel, beginning with 1920. The reader is taken to the time periods, with all of the interactions of daily life, clothes, household items, architecture, working conditions, and societal and economic demands. She paints complete pictures of the immigrant experience, and how their dreams are often shattered. She details quite vividly immigrant life in Chicago, through all of the hardships involved.

Marshall has infused the pages with vivid word-imagery, and prose filled with emotional content. She sets the foundation for what providing means in terms of financial stability and/or love. She leaves the reader to question or think about what it means to provide.

Rosa was the main bread winner in the family. Often there were times she wanted more, like her friends obtained. But, her friends were only interested in monetary gain, and items they could show off or flaunt to others.

Whenever she had those thoughts, she thought of Sanya and the deep love he held for her, and her love for him. He provided for her on an emotional level, and provided what she needed…love. Theirs was a love that lasted through the years. In her eyes, what more could she have asked for. Sanya died a man loved by his wife and children, and died thinking he was a failure. But, he was not a failure in Rosa’s eyes, because his success lied in his devotion and love for Rosa.

The Provider
, in my opinion, is a book that is educational, as far as the immigrant experience, assimilation within time and place, and a novel that Marshall has written with brilliance and sensitivity.

I highly recommend The Provider, by Evelyn R. Marshall to everyone.

February 18, 2013 – 8 Adar I, 5773

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Filed under Book Reviews, Fiction, Historical Fiction, Immigrant Experience, Lorri's Blog, Novels, Uncategorized

Book Review – The Promised Land

the promised land The Promised Land, by Mary Antin,, is an exceptional book in many respects.

Mary Antin was a distinguished writer in her time, and her account of the immigrant experience is unique on several levels.

The first half of the book deals with her childhood in Russia, before emigrating. The second half describes her experience assimilating into American life, and her struggles with religion and daily interactions.

It was obvious to me that Antin projected two faces. One face is the face of her cultural background resulting from her upbringing in Russia. The other face is her face that she projects within her new environment in America, as she tries to settle in and not be defined as a “greenhorn”.

Although Antin seems to be a bit self-centered at times, I still feel that the book is an excellent resource into the immigrant experience. She is cognitive of her appearance, her attitude and her ability to show two sides of herself. That does not diminish the fact that she continues to interact in that manner. It is her way of assimilating into her external surroundings, and her way of retaining some of her cultural heritage at home.

Antin’s descriptions are filled with clarity, and considering the era in which the book was written, I found it to be an excellent example of an immigrant trying to find her way in a new land, a new cultural environment and world.

She was a fast learner, and she endeavored to be seen as an American in every facet. She shed her Russian background as quickly as possible, shed her accent as best she could, and succeeded in displaying herself naturally fitting into her new environment.

Her public education was her starting point, and from there she became involved in social causes. She rallied for the allies, she rallied for immigration rights, other causes, and her voice was a beacon for the immigrant.

The Promised Land
was a successful book for its time, and Antin revealed how a young girl managed to survive and respond to the new life presented her, and to the cultural situations she faced.

Some may find the book uninteresting, and find it to be lacking. I read it with the knowledge it was written in 1912. I found it to be a book written by a woman who realizes she is self-centered, and admits it within the pages. Yet, that very trait helped her gain footing and helped her to fit into her new surroundings. Therein lies the uniqueness.

Mary Antin
was was lauded for her writing, in her own life time.

I recommend The Promised Land for its important historical and cultural content. I found it to be a fascinating look into the assimilation experience.

© Copyright 2007 – All Rights Reserved – No permission is given or allowed to reuse my photography, book reviews, writings, or my poetry in any form/format without my express written consent/permission.

December 10, 2012 – 26 Kislev, 5773

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Filed under Autobiography, Book Reviews, Judaism, Non-Fiction, Uncategorized