Tag Archives: Lorri M blog

Festive Orange Flowers for Purim

africandaisy

Purim begins on Saturday, March 15, 2014 and ends the evening of Sunday, March 16, 2014.

I thought I would contribute some bright orange flowers in my post. The photographs were taken by me within the past few years. The first photograph shows a side view of African Daisies.

Aish has a variety of fantastic books regarding Purim.

poppy side view

The second photo, above, is a side view of poppies, taken at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve a few years back.


Ohev Sholom-The National Synagogue, Washington DC

poppypower3

The third photo, above, was taken along a stretch of road in Lancaster, CA, a few years back.

Visit here to see links to Purim books for children.

floral duo

And, the last photo, above, is one of my own personal favorites.

Have a colorful, festive and joyous Purim!

Shabbat Shalom to everyone! Chag Sameach!

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Lorri M. Review: Mourning & Mitzvah

mourningandmitzvah Mourning &Mitzvah: A Guided Journal for Walking the Mourner’s Path Through Grief to Healing, by Anne Brener is educational, insightful in its representation of the Jewish mourning process, and an excellent learning tool.

It directs the mourner through the grieving process by instructing and guiding them how to keep a diary or journal. By answering questions within the diary or journal, performing meaningful rituals, meditation, etc., the person is thereby enabled to begin working through their grief, a step at a time. The one who is mourning the loss of a loved one can begin to work through their pain and loss, and learn to try to cope with the struggles of daily life, while beginning to confront their pain.

There is no time limit on grief and mourning, as it is a personal process and an emotional process. But, Mourning & Mitzvah is an extremely helpful book in its aspects to bring understanding to those who grieve. It is also helpful for friends and family members to read, in order for them to begin to understand what their loved one is going through, during the traumatic period of a death in their life. They, too, are grieving, and so the input within the pages could be helpful for them.

Whether you are Jewish or not, religious or not, have a spiritual belief or not, the life lessons and the steps that Brener shows us towards coping with the loss of a loved one, is a journey we shouldn’t deprive ourselves of.

Death isn’t just a situation for the deceased or dying, but it is a family issue, for all family members. From mourning, understanding and grieving, Mourning and Mitzvah: A Guided Journal for Walking the Mourner’s Path Through Grief to Healing, by Anne Brener, is a book that belongs on every book shelf, as it is thoroughly educational, gently written, insightful, and is inspirational for all readers.

I find myself referring back to this sensitively written book throughout the year.

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Filed under Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Non-Fiction

Friday Thoughts

birds lake

I finished reading Amos Oz’s novel, A Perfect Peace.

Set in Israel, as most of his books are, it was quite the insightful story. The 1960s kibbutz setting emphasized the harshness and the difficulties the individuals had to go through in order to find a sense of place, sense of Self and sense of peace.

The characters were floundering for varied reasons, and their mindsets were brought to the forefront by Oz’s masterful writing. From first-generation disenchantment with kibbutz life in the stifling environment, where “privacy” is only a word, to the almost guinea pig atmosphere of life, Oz confronts the issues of daily life with strength and uncompromising honesty.

Through Oz’s honest appraisal, the reader is given privy to the corruption that runs rampant throughout the kibbutz and the state. It is not an idealistic story in that respect. Some of the less than ideal situations causes much disharmony within the kibbutz, where life is stifling to begin with. In the view of a few of the first generation to be born on an Israel kibbutz, kibbutz life defined as stifling would be an understatement.

We are given access to the mindsets of the characters, and their disillusions, anger and rage, questioning of ethics and questioning of participation in the humane along with the non-humane running of a tight ship, almost in a tyrannical fashion. Lack of motivation leads one man in particular, named Yoni, to want to leave the kibbutz in order to find what he believes he is missing. He feels there must be something better and more worthwhile outside of the confines of his daily life.

Yet, another individual tries to move in, and is in constant fear of being turned away, and of not being accepted and liked by others. His trials and tribulations take different paths than Yoni.

Oz understood the social, political, emotional and environmental aspects. I applaud Amos Oz for his excellent and brilliant word-images he presents us, and for his mastery in not only conveying corruption, but also in conveying the kibbutz life in all of its essences. I recommend A Perfect Peace to everyone.

This was not actually a review, but more of a post written because of the thoughts within my own mind regarding kibbutz life in respect from those who founded them, and those who became the first generation of the founders. Kibbutz life affected the first-generation in ways that have not usually been written about. Life was not easy, was harsh, was not conceived as individualistic. Each individual was a part of the whole, part of the kibbutz community. Each child seemingly had more than one mother and father.

How this upbringing impacted the children gives one food for thought. Most of the adults were escaping a pogrom, escaping Holocaust-related events, tyranny, antisemitic abuse, escaping in order to find a better life. The kibbutz was a form of communal effort and struggles, some of which did not afford the adults the dreams they had wished for.

Those dreams were quashed and their children were raised with firm hands and old ideas and ideals. In essence, their own dreams (children’s) were not given any credence, and they came to regard them as not able to be fulfilled. The story line was quite illuminating in that respect.

Shabbat Shalom!

Update: I am sorry for the update. I want to make something clear. My thoughts in reference to kibbutz life are not meant to be in anyway reflective of a negative attitude on my part. I have relatives and have friends who spent part of their teen years or young adult years on one, and had wonderful experiences. The book details one kibbutz of many, and a few individuals living in that kibbutz, along with their own baggage.

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Filed under Historical Fiction, Jewish History, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Novels, Uncategorized

Sunday Scenes- February 16, 2014

yellow boat

It is Sunday, once again, and time for Sunday Scenes. Sunday Scenes does not necessarily imply there will be a photograph, but there usually is. It is just my way of titling my blog post on a given Sunday.

First off, why not go and browse the links at Havel Havelim, the Jewish Blogger’s Carnival.

Did you know that Shel Silverstein’s book, The Giving Tree has turned fifty years old? You will be able to read it digitally, through HarperCollins Publishing.

To The Point: Posters by Dan Reisinger, is an exhibit at the Skirball Cultural Center, through April 20, 2014.

I finished reading Goliath’s Head, by Alan Fleishman. It was quite compelling.

Let us remember Sid Caesar, and his amazing contributions to comedy and TV. z”l

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Friday Ramblings – October 25, 2013

sunning

odd one

Visit Leora, at Sketching Out, for her review of In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist.

I will be seeing the movie The Pin. It looks quite compelling in many aspects. If you have seen it, please let me know what you thought of it.

Effort begins to return Iraqi Jewish artifacts, back to the Iraqi Jewish community.

This is an interesting article regarding the growth of Orthodox Judaism.

The Family: Three Journies Into the Heart of the Twentieth Century looks to be a fascinating book, in my opinion.

Ⓒ All rights reserved © Copyright 2007 – 2013 – All Rights Reserved – No permission is given or allowed to reuse my photography, book reviews, writings, or my poetry in any form/format without my express written consent/permission.

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Sunday Scenes – October 20, 2013

leaving

pond

That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou see’st the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west;
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire,
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the deathbed whereon it must expire,
Consumed with that which it was nourished by.
This thou perceiv’st, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well which thou must leave ere long.

-William Shakespeare

October 20, 2013 – 16 Cheshvan, 5774

Ⓒ All rights reserved © Copyright 2007 – 2013 – All Rights Reserved – No permission is given or allowed to reuse my photography, book reviews, writings, or my poetry in any form/format without my express written consent/permission.

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