Review: Safekeeping: A Novel

Safekeeping, by Jessamyn Hope, is a book that blends a Medieval sapphire brooch with the lives of those living on a kibbutz in Israel, and those who have come to volunteer there. I was engrossed from the first page to the last page.

The story line explores how the old timers, the founders of the kibbutz and their adult children, intermingle with those who are volunteers. The dynamics between the sides are depicted in depth.

The staunch socialistic attitude of Ziva, one of the original founders, is compared to her own son. Ziva believes everyone on the kibbutz is equal and everyone deserves the same status and pay scale, “all for one, and one for all”, so to speak. Possessions are a part of the whole, and no one person owns anything. All items are pooled for the communal good.

Whereas, her son who is a first-generation offspring, has a tendency to lean towards the more modern ideals, and towards privatizing the kibbutz. He believes that salaries should equate with education and experience, and should be offered as such to individuals who fit the criteria.

Therein lies a kibbutz conflict. The conflict is between hard=liners and the newer generations.

As far as the volunteers are concerned, there is Adam. He has traveled from New York in order to give the brooch to a woman named Dagmar. His grandfather, who was a Holocaust survivor and who lived on the kibbutz for a while, wanted her to have it. The brooch has been in their family, passed down through generations. Adam is trying to redeem himself from alcohol and drugs, and of a crime of his choosing. He feels that if he is able to resolve this one issue regarding the brooch,, he will be free of the demons that have imprisoned him.

Claudette, a French Canadian, is another volunteer. She has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), and has been imprisoned by it her entire life, through her repetitive actions. Her relationship with a teenaged boy named Ofir is central to her self-esteem and her ability to grow, emotionally and mentally.

Ulya, a Russian beauty, is in a relationship with Farid, a Palestinian farmhand. He is head-over-heels in love with her. She manipulates situations to suit her needs, including her secretive meetings with Farid.

The quick description of these individuals seems simplistic, but within the pages the author infuses a definitive personality of each person. She illuminates their strengths, weaknesses, fears and manipulations. Love and loss are themes, presented to the reader. The story line is filled with the humanness of people struggling to create a life for themselves. Their goals are examined, and their fortitude is put to the test.

The volunteers are there for different reasons, and their ambitions and backgrounds are different. Yet, within those differences there is a commonality of the humanistic side of their needs and hopes.

Then, there is that brooch, that brooch and how it affects specific individuals, who think their lives will change, be diminished or be enhanced by possessing it. The original creator of the brooch had no idea to what extremes the brooch would affect the lives of those who live centuries later. A thing of beauty becomes a catalyst.

To the kibbutz founders the brooch takes on a different meaning and depth than it does to the volunteers. That is one of the unique aspects of the story, and one I enjoyed reading about. The dimensions and layers within the pages are brilliant, like the brooch, itself.

I found the story to be a deep depiction of emotional and mental capacities within the framework of kibbutz life, and those who choose to remain in an environment of socialism and extremes, compared to those who choose to move forward and bring a new definition to the kibbutz and community within it. Whether it be fifty years or one hundred years or more, nothing is continually static. Life goes on, changes occur, and nothing remains the same within the scheme of things.

Safekeeping is an extremely compelling and intense read, leaving one to ponder questions of identity, change, old time attitudes, socialism, autonomy, and materialistic items within the realm of individual possession, or as part of the whole.

The story line is complex, and handled masterfully through Jessamyn Hope’s writing. I applaud her dedication to historical fact, and to the humanness of her characters.

I want to thank Fig Tree Books, and want to thank Erika Dreifus for the Advanced Review Copy. I feel privileged to have been given the book-which I thoroughly enjoyed.

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Filed under Fiction, Historical Fiction, Jewish History, Novels

Italian Immigrants

Having Italian ancestry in my family, books regarding New York City and Italian immigrants are quite popular in my reading genres. I enjoy both the historical fiction books and the nonfiction books.

I finished reading a novel called Elizabeth Street, by Laurie Fabiano. The story line takes place during the first decade of the 20th century. The book depicts based on the author’s own Italian immigrant family. The pages are filled with the essence of the hardships of daily living and survival during a harsh time period. Fortitude, desire, and the will to assimilate and conquer the living conditions, crime and social inequalities forced upon Italian immigrants seem to be the basis for the book, along with prejudice of the Italians. I am fascinated with what I have read, so far.

I have read other books regarding Italian immigration, and New York City immigrants, in general. Each book has given me new snippets to ponder.

How the Other Half Lives, by Jacob Riis, is an extremely compelling book.

Vita: A Novel, by Melania G. Mazzucco, is another compelling read regarding the Italian immigrant experience.

Openwork: A Novel, by Adria Bernardi depicts three generations of Italian families, and their journey from Italy to New York City.

I also recommend The Shoemaker’s Wife, by Adriana Trigiani

I watched a show on PBS entitled The Italian Americans. It is a two-part four-hour series. It ended last night-February 24th. You can watch episodes online.

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Filed under Fiction, Historical Fiction, Immigrant Experience, Lorri's Blog, Novels

Jewish Book Carnival for February 2015

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Leora’s blog, Sketching Out, is hosting the February Jewish Book Carnival 2015. Please take the time to visit and browse the resources/links.

From a beautiful photograph, to a podcast, from book discussions and book reviews to poetry and the Sydney Taylor Award 2015 Blog Tour, there is something there for everyone!

Shavua Tov! Have a great week!

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Filed under Book Reviews, Historical Fiction, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Non-Fiction, Novels

Perspective in Winter

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I took the two photographs above, yesterday. They were captured from the same spot, but I zoomed in on one, just a fraction, changing the perspective and creating two different photographs.

No man has the right to dictate what other men should perceive, create or produce, but all

should be encouraged to reveal themselves, their perceptions and emotions, and to build

confidence in the creative spirit.” ― Ansel Adams

Shabbat Shalom to those who celebrate! Have a wonderful weekend, to everyone!

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Shabbat Shalom!

I am involved in reading The Source, a novel by James Michener. It is my third reading.

I read it decades ago, the first time, right after its publication, and read it a second time about twenty years ago. I am reading it for a book club. I love this novel so much, for varied reasons. The archeological aspect is so intriguing and fascinating. The kibbutz story line, is also, and the characters that wind their way through that lifestyle.

I love the archeology digs, within the story and how each time period is ascertained by the characters to be correct and documented. I enjoy reading about the characters within a specific period of time, their daily lives, their social aspects and their mindsets and growth.

Well, onward I go, synagogue calls me in an hour.

Shabbat Shalom! For those who do not celebrate, have a great weekend.

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Tu B’Shevat Begins at Sunset

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Tu B’Shevat begins at sunset, tonight, and ends at nightfall tomorrow, February 4th.” It is The New Year for the Trees.

Tu B’Shevat is the new year for the purpose of calculating the age of trees for tithing. See Lev. 19:23-25, which states that fruit from trees may not be eaten during the first three years; the fourth year’s fruit is for G-d, and after that, you can eat the fruit. Each tree is considered to have aged one year as of Tu B’Shevat, so if you planted a tree on Shevat 14, it begins its second year the next day, but if you plant a tree two days later, on Shevat 16, it does not reach its second year until the next Tu B’Shevat.

horse and pond

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Filed under Jewish History, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Photography, Uncategorized