Jewaicious Review – The Black Seasons

   The Black Seasons by Michal Glowinski is a poignant rendering of portions of Glowinski’s childhood memories from the Warsaw Ghetto to his life while hiding from the Nazis, to being rescued by Catholic nuns and becoming a Holocaust Survivor.

The word drifted into my ears as people around me deliberated: will they lock us in the ghetto or not? I didn’t know what this word meant, yet I realized that it was connected with moving; I sensed that it was something adults were speaking of with fear, but to me it seemed that moving would be an interesting adventure.

Glowinski writes with visual descriptives so vivid and clear that one can almost feel them and inhale the scents of ghetto life. The struggles of daily existence within the confines allocated to the Jewish people is written with deep clarity. The Black Seasons might seem disjointed at times, but that is due to the fact that events are remembered in that fashion.

Can one fault Glowinski for writing in such a manner? No, not in my opinion! One is transported by the word-paintings. The canvas and back drop are not pretty.

The Black Seasons is painterly, the horror well-articulated by Glowinski, and he documents his accounts of  fear and anxiety in fragments, remembered through a young boy’s pieces of visual and emotional memory. Glowinski brings us insight into the human condition of the Jewish family unit during the Holocaust. Glowinski illuminates within us the fact that life is fragile. Combining the transition from childhood to adulthood, Michal Glowinski manages to transport us through history and time, effectively, brilliantly and with skillful writing. I highly recommend The Black Seasons. It belongs in every school library, college and university library, and on your own book shelf.

 

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4 Comments

Filed under Book Reviews, Historical Fiction, Holocaust/Genocide, Judaism, Memoirs

4 responses to “Jewaicious Review – The Black Seasons

  1. This sound alike a great book. Is it recent?

  2. Thank you for this review. What a marked contrast to the childhood of your grandchildren. No one should know such pain, anguish or sorrow.

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