Monthly Archives: May 2014

Sea and Beach Scenics

sea scene

seaweed

Sea and beach scenics…my mind is wandering today, and I am looking forward to a late July trip to visit my brother in Monterey, CA. It’s down the road a bit, or, should I say down the coast a bit (it is actually up the coast/north of here), but I can daydream, can’t I!!?

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Filed under Lorri's Blog, Photography

Birthday and Lifespan

My dear father, Z’l, would have turned 99-years old, today. His lifespan was less than half of that…45-years. I knew him 16 of those 45-years (well actually 14 years, because he was in the military, and overseas). Those 14 years filled my life with cherished moments, moments joyful and poignant. Those years were an illumination of your love and hopes for me.

grandmadad

Happy Birthdays, Dad. Each year of your life brought happiness and love to those around you. Yom Huledet Sameach.

The photo above shows my Bubbe, Z”l, holding my father…he was a only few months old.

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Fortunate Versus Unfortunate

lake calmness

I found this poem on Rabbi Aaron Bergman’s Site. It struck a chord with me. The analogies of those who are loved, nurtured and cared for, as opposed to those who live from moment to moment without necessary substance, left my heart feeling heavy. The prose speaks volumes regarding the fortunate versus the unfortunate children, babes, innocents, within the globe of humanity.

With everything that is occurring worldwide, I thought it a compelling reminder to remember all the world’s children in your prayers, tonight, and every night.

“We Pray for Children” by Ina Hughes

We pray for children
Who put chocolate fingers everywhere,
Who like to be tickled,
Who stomp in puddles and ruin their new pants,
Who sneak Popsicles before supper,
Who erase holes in math workbooks,
Who can never find their shoes.

And we pray for those
Who stare at photographers from behind barbed wire,
Who can’t bound down the street in new sneakers,
Who never “counted potatoes,”
Who are born in places we wouldn’t be caught dead in,
Who never go to the circus,
Who live in an X-rated world.

We pray for children
Who bring us sticky kisses and fistfuls of dandelions,
Who sleep with the cat and bury goldfish,
Who hug us in a hurry and forget their lunch money,
Who squeeze toothpaste all over the sink,
Who slurp their soup.

And we pray for those
Who never get dessert,
Who have no safe blanket to drag behind them,
Who can’t find any bread to steal,
Who don’t have any rooms to clean up,
Whose pictures aren’t on anybody’s dresser,
Whose monsters are real.

We pray for children
Who spend all their allowance before Tuesday,
Who throw tantrums in the grocery store and pick at their food,
Who like ghost stories,
Who shove dirty clothes under the bed,
Who get visits from the tooth fairy,
Who don’t like to be kissed in front of the car pool,
Who squirm in church and scream on the phone,
Whose tears we sometimes laugh at and whose smiles can make us cry.

And we pray for those
Whose nightmares come in the daytime,
Who will eat anything,
Who have never seen a dentist,
Who are never spoiled by anyone,
Who go to bed hungry and cry themselves to sleep,
Who live and move, but have no being.

We pray for children
Who want to be carried
And for those who must,
For those we never give up on
And for those who never get a second chance,
For those we smother.
And for those who will grab the hand of anybody kind
enough to offer it.

We pray for children. Amen.

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Filed under Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Photography, poetry

Review: Last Train to Istanbul

lasttrainto If you like reading historical fiction regarding Turkey, then Last Train to Istanbul, by Ayse Kulin, is a book I highly recommend. I, personally, could not put it down once I started reading it.

The story revolves around Selva and Sabiha, two sisters, and how their lives take dramatic turns in Ankara, Turkey. Their father is a retired government official, and a man who is greatly respected. The family is Muslim. This presents a problem within the ideals of the family unit.

Selva falls in love with a Jewish man named Rafael Alfandari. His family is also highly regarded and have been physicians of the court for many centuries.
Selva’s father disowns her, casts her out from the family for Selva and Rafael leave Istanbul for France, where they feel they will have a better life. Within that mode, events cause their lives to take unforeseen actions, actions that are dangerous and life-threatening.

Sabiha marries within the circle of aristocracy, to a man named Macit who works for the Turkish Foreign Ministry. This fact would prove fruitful in the coming years. She was a devoted sister, and her actions illuminate that.

As the story line unfolds, the reader is privy to historical facts and events leading up to Turkey’s involvement in the evacuations of Jews from Paris to Istanbul in 1943. This reader was captivated by the actions presented to me throughout the pages. I knew little about Turkey during World War II and was enlightened as to the efforts that were put forth by the “neutral” country to rescue Jews. Jews were welcomed into the arms of the country, and not just Jews of Turkish descent, but also non-Turkish Jews.

From the underground and resistance groups, to the Turkish offices of Paris and Marseilles, to the Turkish Foreign Ministry, everyone bands together in order to get Rafael and his family out of France. Selva has opportunities to leave without him, but is determined to stay with him through all costs.

We are given perspectives from both of the sisters, within the framework of a double narrative. The political situation in Turkey is demonstrated with forthrightness. Society, as a whole is well-depicted. Life in France is presented with all of its nuances and social qualities. The war and how it affects both Selva and Sabiha is realistically and believably shown.

The Last Train to Istanbul
was a page-turner for me, and a novel filled with extreme historical details, which were obviously highly researched by Kulin, a well-esteemed Turkish writer. Her efforts did not go unnoticed, by me. I am a World War II history fan, and was given new insight into the dynamics that Turkey played (although “neutral”) in the assistance of rescuing Jews.

I liked the aspect of family, and how the two sisters struggle within their own environments to not only survive, but to keep in touch under adverse conditions. Selva’s concern for her family in Ankara is strongly written, as well as her thoughts regarding her father and his disowning her. Sabiha’s concern for her sister is also deeply depicted, and her struggles to bring Selva and her family back home seem quite plausable due to her husband’s influential connections.

Family dynamics are explored in depth, along with social stigmas and politics. Jewish Turkey is illuminated, and that fact gave this reader much insight into the country prewar and events leading up to, and during, the horrific time of war.

The author’s use of the strength of love and survival under the duress and adversity of war is a definite foundation of the story line. I totally became involved within the pages of Last Train to Istanbul. Brava to Ayse Kulin, and to the translator, John W. Baker.

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Filed under Book Reviews, Historical Fiction, Holocaust/Genocide, Jewish History, Lorri's Blog, Novels