Review: The Butterfly and the Violin

The Butterfly and the Violin, by Kristy Cambron is a story focusing on the Holocaust and a particular painting. The story bounces between events occurring pre-World War II, World War II, itself, and the current time period.

A painting of a woman, hair shorn, holding a violin, is the glue that bonds two specific individuals together, as they try to find out information regarding the painting, and locate the owner of it. During their research, they become deeply attached to each other. Each person has their own past, their own secrets they are withholding.

Unfortunately, the story did not speak to me. I felt the modern day characters were weak, not realized, and I thought they were lacking in substance and depth.

Their superficiality flowed throughout the pages, in my opinion. The relationships that develop, which include a young child, do not seem to be realistic, as to specifics within the relationships. I could not imagine that some of the modern day, familial depictions could actually happen. The ending was extremely disappointing, and left me devoid of a final conclusion.

Some Holocaust-related truths and facts were infused within the pages. Events and modes of operation were described, along with visuals that the reader could “see” before them. In that aspect, the word imagery was defining. Unfortunately, that information is colored by the novel’s multiple stories within the entirety.

What I thought was going to be a serious novel regarding the Holocaust was more of a novel with loose ends, a novel not for readers who want a compelling Holocaust story. The Butterfly and the Violin, by Kristy Cambron, in my opinion, would be better served as a book for teenagers and young adults (early 20s).

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4 Comments

Filed under Book Reviews, Historical Fiction, Holocaust/Genocide, Lorri's Blog, Novels

4 responses to “Review: The Butterfly and the Violin

  1. OK – you were honest. Thank you for the review.

  2. Thank you for sharing your review of this book, Lorri. I always find it very difficult, if not impossible, to continue to reading a book which just isn’t ‘making it’ for me. I always want to quit and move on to one of the countless other books waiting to be read! How do you do it? Any thoughts on this dilemma? Maybe being such a voracious reader – and committed to writing a review – helps get you through?

    • Thank you for visiting. I usually want to quit reading, also, but kept on reading, hoping that there would be some turn of events that would captivate me in a positive way.

      It is what it is…and I am now back to reading other books on my pile.

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