Category Archives: Judaism

Yom HaShoah – Holocaust Remembrance Day

Yom HaShoah begins at sundown, tonight, May 1, 2019, and ends at sundown May 2, 2019. Let us never forget…

Here is a link, to ‘Velveteen Rabbi’ Blog where you can read twelve poems for Yom HaShoah that were written by different individuals, and also a memorial prayer.

If you want to learn more about the Holocaust, visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

You might also want to visit Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center.

This poem was written during WWII, etched on the wall of a cellar in Cologne, Germany, by a Jewish person in hiding. It has also been attributed to being written on a wall in a Nazi concentration camp, in Cologne, Germany.

“I believe in the sun
even when it is not shining
And I believe in love,
even when there’s no one there.
And I believe in God,
even when he is silent.
– Unknown

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World War II and Holocaust-related Books Recently Read

World War II books have always been a passion to me, and especially books that cover the Holocaust. I am an avid reader, and feel that my continual reading of Holocaust-related books will keep me focused on remembrance, courage, love and loss, identity, displacement, assimilation, socialization, trauma, and the appalling and horrific events that consumed individuals, both in those who were murdered, and the after-affects and after-effects of survivors and their families.

Here is a list of some of the books I have recently read, that deal with World War II and the Holocaust:

The Wartime Sisters by Linda Cohen Loigman

Ashes in the Snow by Ruta Sepetys

All That Is by James Salter

The Taster by V.S. Alexander

A Brief Stop On the Road From Auschwitz by Goran Rosenberg

In His Father’s Footsteps by Danielle Steel

The Only Woman in the Room by Marie Benedict

News of Our Loved Ones by Abigail DeWitt

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Filed under Fiction, Historical Fiction, Holocaust/Genocide, Jewish History, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Non-Fiction, World War II

Bareness Beauty

bared

*Diary of Anne Frank
The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely, or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quite alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be and that God wishes to see people happy, amidst the simple beauty of nature. As long as this exists, and it certainly always will, I know that then there will always be comfort for every sorrow… And I firmly believe that nature brings solace in all troubles.

bareness

The bareness of winter lingers into spring
trees still unclothed, no sign of buds, blossoms
Snow patches cling to mountains, brownness hovers

Beauty exists in the realm between then and now
within bared trunks, branches, and nature’s quietude
illuminating my heart, my soul, with awe and joy.
-Lorri M.

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Remember…

yahrzeit2

Another day is upon us.  Let us take a moment to remember what was, what is, and what might come.

Today we lost a woman of great strength and humaneness.  Yaffa Eliach has died.  She created “The Tower of Faces” in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

“The Tower of Faces” is so profound.  Each time I have seen it, I am left speechless, filled with awe and deep respect for Yaffa Eliach’s tremendous efforts in creating the memorial.  The photographs speak wonders of the individuals, times gone by, a collective history, moments in living, lives lost due to hatred.

One cannot walk through the immense exhibit without it affecting them intensely.

Thank you.

Rest in Peace, Yaffa Eliach.

~~~~~

Today, I remember Kristallnacht.

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On November 9th and 10th, 1938, Kristallnacht (an intense series of attacks on Jews fostered by the Nazi party paramilitary) became known as the “Night of Broken Glass”. The glass storefronts of the Jewish-owned businesses were totally shattered, by both the paramilitary and by local citizens. The interior of Fasanenstrasse Synagogue in Berlin was destroyed, along with so many other structures.

At least 91 Jews were killed in the attacks, and a further 30,000 arrested and incarcerated in concentration camps.  Jewish homes, hospitals, and schools were ransacked, as the attackers demolished buildings with sledgehammers.  Over 1,000 synagogues were burned (95 in Vienna alone), and over 7,000 Jewish businesses destroyed or damaged.”

Remember…

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Sunday Scenes: November 6, 2016

autumn-day

 

Yesterday morning turned out to be a beautiful, sunny day.  The sky was illuminated with clouds and blueness.  Contrary to the grey within the clouds, the sun was shining brightly, and within thirty minutes those grey clouds turned to perfectly white loveliness.

 

 

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To the left of the fence is the South Fork Trail, taken yesterday morning while walking.  There is no sign of life in the photo (other than nature’s beauty), but within one hour, there were marathon runners to the left of the fence, along the trail.  I didn’t take photographs of the runners.  I was there to strictly cheer them on.  Sometimes it is more important to watch than to photograph a scene.

It was quite the sight to see.  There was an abundance of color from the running outfits, and an abundance of feet.  Having run the L.A. Marathon in 1994, I appreciate the effort, training and dedication it takes to not only run, but finish, a marathon.

Here’s hoping your week is a good one!

 

 

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Review: Kaddish for an Unborn Child

Kaddish for an Unborn Child, by Imre Kertesz, was a difficult book, in the sense that the narrator was rambling, repetitiously, due to his stream of consciousness.

The novel opens with the word ‘No!’  It is an answer to a question asked him, the question being did he have a child.   He also answered his wife the same way, when she wanted a child.  From there the reader is led through the narrator’s bleak, dark and depressed outlook on life and living.

The narrator is a writer.  Within the ramblings the sentences run into each other, as his thoughts unfold on the pages.  He tries to illuminate all of his thoughts and feelings, often repeating what he has just stated.  This is due to the workings of his mind, and the fact he has an urgency to get it all out in the open.  This urgency is what keeps him alive, literally.  He has much to criticize regarding his life, including his childhood.

The narrator compares his abusive and restricted childhood to his existence in Auschwitz.  Rules and the oppressive environment almost seem normal to him, coming from his controlled adolescent upbringing.  Once liberated his perceptions regarding daily life continue in the same vein.  He encloses himself within the walls of isolation.

His routine continues to be a somewhat confined existence, as he transcends from being a Holocaust camp prisoner, to living for years sheltered from life in a rented room.  He compares his living arrangement to that of the camps, in the sense that he has been restricted and limited in space, and therefore in daily life.

Of course, much of his limitations have been self-induced repercussions and extensions of the Holocaust.  Once he marries, he ponders the issues of an apartment with his wife, and how he has never thought of spaciousness, furniture, this or that.  The rented room was self-contained, with all of the essentials provided.  His pen was his life’s companion.  He had need for nothing else.

I won’t delve into the story line any further.  It was enough to get through the novel in its entirety.  It was an emotionally, laborious read in many aspects, reinforcing the Holocaust and its mental and emotional effects and affects on those who survive, those who are generational survivors, and on those who are victims of a survivor’s bleak and dark mindset.  In this case, his wife was a victim of the narrator’s mindset and his demons.

Within the darkness, I found Kaddish for an Unborn Child to be an excellent resource on the philosophical and psychological aspects of humanity’s, Holocaust nightmare.

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