Tag Archives: Books

Books, Trees, Etc.

geese-and-tree

I have read several books since the beginning of 2017.  Here is a list of them:

Moon glow, by Michael Chabon
An Unnecessary Woman, by Rabih Alameddine
Nutshell, by Ian McEwan
Judas, by Amos Oz
Frantumaglia, A Writer’s Journey, by Elena Ferrante
Women Heroes of World War II, by Kathryn J. Atwood

I am currently reading Arch of Triumph, by Erich Maria Remarque. I have read two other books that he wrote: All Quiet on the Western Front, and wrote The Night in Lisbon.

I was away for two weeks. I visited my daughter and her family in Washington. It was a wonderful two weeks, filled with joy and love. What more can one ask for!

I hope to post more during 2017. Time seemed to get away from me during 2016.

winter-tree

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Bookish Friday-October 3, 2013

inlet

I have recently added a couple of new books to my to-read stack:


Rav Hisda’s Daughter: Book I: Apprentice: A Novel of Love, the Talmud and Sorcery
, by Maggie Anton

I totally enjoyed Maggie Anton’s trilogy on Rashi’s Daughters, and look forward to this book.

The Oxford Book of Jewish Stories, by Ilan Stavans (recommended by Leora)


Paris, The Novel
, by Edward Rutherfurd

I am in the middle of reading New York, The Novel, by Edward Rutherfurd. Well, I shouldn’t say “middle”, as I am about 18% into it, as it is almost 900 pages. I do enjoy Rutherfurd’s books, though.

Blossomsmall

Leora’s recipe for Stuffed Squash with Yams sounds delicious.

On a very serious note, Batya/me-ander has a post regarding a breast milk mix-up…in other words a baby received breast milk from an HIV-positive mother.

Shabbat Shalom!

October 4, 2013 – 30 Tishrei, 5774

Ⓒ All rights reserved © Copyright 2007 – 2013 – All Rights Reserved – No permission is given or allowed to reuse my photography, book reviews, writings, or my poetry in any form/format without my express written consent/permission.

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Review – Fugitive Pieces

  Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels is more than a novel based on the Holocaust, it is a poetically-rendered geological metaphor for the power of loss and love, memory and place. Human history is woven within the bogs and peat of the past and present, as both are intertwined within the beautifully written stories.

Yes, stories. Fugitive Pieces has two narrators…one for the first two-thirds of the book, one for the last third. The transition from one narrator (Jakob) to the next (Ben) might seem awkward for some, but I found it to be a brilliant method of bringing two men from two different generations together within the whole of the novel. The layers of their lives read like an archaeological dig, through the muck and mire of the Holocaust.

Our first narratorJakob witnessed the horror of war at a young age, listening from within a cupboard, as his parents were being murdered and his sister being taken away by the Nazis. “The burst door.  Wood ripped from hinges, cracking like ice under the shouts.  Noises never heard before, torn from my father’s mouth.  Then silence.“  In order to survive, he becomes a fugitive of sorts, and he hides himself in the bogs and peat of the forest, burying himself underground, burying pieces of his past with him. He is like an organism, living for a day here, a day there within the bog, surviving as an organism or parasite, living off of the peat. Along comes Athos, a Greek geologist, who finds Jakob barely able to breathe, and brings Jakob to live with him in Greece. Athos is like a father to Jakob, and raises him like he is his own son.

Yet, all the fatherly affection and love can’t bring Jakob peace from the emotional past he is fleeing. He is like a piece of wood loosened from a desk, separated from the entirety. He dreams of his sister, Bella, in order to survive. He must have some hope, and she is his inspiration. Jakob physically matures into a young man. He becomes a poet, a writer, a translator, trying to find his way in a world of loss and sadness. He is stuck in that layer of time that has yet to be dug out.

Meanwhile, Ben looks to Jakob as a mentor. He too is a survivor. A survivor of his parents (Holocaust Survivors) and their daily nightmares, fears and eccentricities.

Michaels writes with flair and frankness, beauty and poignancy, and weaves the novel with brilliance.  Her naming each chapter is a definite foreshadowing of events and illuminations to follow.  I find her title to the book to be very revealing, if taken literally.  The transitory factor is ephemral, as parts of the whole are often short-lived, and characters, like Bella, Jakob and Ben are fugacious and unable to blossom to their full potential. Jakob is much like an organism in the geological scheme of things, in the sense he can’t let go of the past. Ben is in the same emotional situation within his family unit. Both of them have trouble with relationships, each relationship a small piece of the stepping stone to fulfillment and contentment.

Fugitive Pieces is an important story, in my opinion, not for historical fact, not for Holocaust history, but for its layers of humanity, humaneness, and the bogs of emotional pain and dust that are eventually swept away through time and love.
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© Copyright 2007 – All Rights Reserved – No permission is given or allowed to reuse my photography, book reviews, writings, or my poetry in any form/format without my expresss written consent/permission.

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Filed under Historical Fiction, Holocaust/Genocide, Judaism, Non-Fiction, Novels