Tag Archives: Jewish celebration

Sukkot Dinner Pre Shabbat

sukkahnby rochelle blumenfeld copy

I love the painting, above, Succah, by Rochelle Blumenfeld.

Tonight will be spent at the synagogue celebrating Sukkot with a dinner in the synagogue’s Succah.  The Brotherhood is preparing the entire dinner, and doing all of the cleanup before Shabbat service begins.  How nice of them!

The women can sit back and enjoy the fare, without having to lift a finger, except to eat the food.  It is a rare occasion!  But, we are extremely grateful for this moment in time.

honey pot


The honey pot and the plate above were mine.  I treasured them for years.  I lovingly let them go to the next generation before moving back to CA, by handing them over to my daughter.  I know she will treasure them, as I did, with love.

For those who celebrate-Shabbat Shalom! To everyone, enjoy your weekend.


Filed under Jewish History, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Photography

Tu B’Shevat Begins at Sunset

orange-grove 11

Tu B’Shevat begins at sunset, tonight, and ends at nightfall tomorrow, February 4th.” It is The New Year for the Trees.

Tu B’Shevat is the new year for the purpose of calculating the age of trees for tithing. See Lev. 19:23-25, which states that fruit from trees may not be eaten during the first three years; the fourth year’s fruit is for G-d, and after that, you can eat the fruit. Each tree is considered to have aged one year as of Tu B’Shevat, so if you planted a tree on Shevat 14, it begins its second year the next day, but if you plant a tree two days later, on Shevat 16, it does not reach its second year until the next Tu B’Shevat.

horse and pond


Filed under Jewish History, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Photography, Uncategorized

Speaking of Huts…


Wondering off the beaten path at the lake, I came across two distinct hut-like structures. I often wonder about those oddities that one finds in unexpected places.

Was it built to keep the heat of the sun off of the person who built it? Or, possibly it was built because rain was expected, and there was a homeless person/s living inside it, at one point. Maybe a family had a picnic and thought it would be fun to sit within a hut.


Speaking of huts, Sukkot, or the Feast of the Booths or Tabernacles, begins the evening of October 8th, and ends the evening of October 15th. It is one of Judaism’s Three Pilgrimage Festivals.

It is a season of harvest, and a season of remembrance. The Israelites dwelt in these types of temporary dwellings during their 40 years of journeying through the desert. Let us remember their hardships and obstacles that they forged through. Agricultural workers also dwelt in this type of temporary dwelling during harvest season.

Jews celebrate Sukkot by eating inside a sukkah (hut, tent) for eight days (seven in Israel). All meals are supposed to be taken inside of it. Read about its history, here.

The sukkah is built with four species of plants:

etrog (אתרוג) – the fruit of a citron tree
lulav (לולב) – a ripe, green, closed frond from a date palm tree
hadass (הדס) – boughs with leaves from the myrtle tree
aravah (ערבה) – branches with leaves from the willow tree

You can read more about the custom/s here.


The House on the Roof: A Sukkot Story, by David Adler, is a great children’s book. The story is a wonderful example of Jewish tradition versus religious tolerance, and it is based on an actual happening.

Chag Sameach!

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Filed under Jewish History, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Photography

Hanukkah is Almost Upon Us

Menorah Artwork hanging on exterior wall at Skirball Cultural Center

Menorah Artwork hanging on exterior wall at Skirball Cultural Center

Hanukkah is almost upon us. The house has been decorated by my grandies, and looks festive with its blue and white illuminations, with a touch of silver thrown in, here and there. Hanukkah books related to their age are spread on various tables for them to look through, read, and/or have us read to them.

Kindle the taper like the steadfast star
Ablaze on evening’s forehead o’er the earth,
And add each night a lustre till afar
An eightfold splendor shine above thy hearth.
~Emma Lazarus, “The Feast of Lights”



The miracle, of course, was not that the oil for the sacred light –
in a little cruse – lasted as long as they say;
but that the courage of the Maccabees lasted to this day:
let that nourish my flickering spirit.

~Charles Reznikoff, “Meditations on the Fall and Winter Holidays”

Menorah at Skirball Cultural Center

Menorah at Skirball Cultural Center

Books recently finished reading:

The Perfume Collector

The Paris Architect

The Book Thief

The Grandchildren of the Ghetto


Filed under Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Photography

Sunday Scenes – February 24, 2013

Jerusalem dances by shoshi Kraus

Jerusalem Dances, by Shoshi Kraus

Purim by Baruch Nachshon

Purim, by Baruch Nachshon

It’s Purim! Celebrate! Enjoy! Be happy and merry!

All rights reserved © Copyright 2007 – All Rights Reserved – No permission is given or allowed to reuse my photography, book reviews, writings, or my poetry in any form/format without my express written consent/permission.

February 24, 2013 – 14 Adar I, 5773


Filed under Artistic Work, Judaism, Lorri's Blog

Tu B’Shvat – Happy Birthday Trees!

Tonight at dusk, begins the celebration of Tu B’Shvat, or New Year of the Trees. It is not a major Jewish holiday, but still a wonderful reason to participate and celebrate this happy Jewish traditional. It will continue through dusk tomorrow.

Some celebrate with a feast of varied fruits and/or nuts harvested from trees. The planting of trees is another custom, especially in Israel, where trees are planted through the Jewish National Fund. It is the like Arbor Day, in the U.S.

Environmental education has grown from this lovely Jewish tradition. Take a moment to reflect on our environment and what we can do to help conserve and preserve our resources.

February 7, 2012 – 14 Sh’vat, 5772

All photography, writing, poetry, etc. is my copyright and may not be reproduced without my express written permission.


Filed under Judaism, Photography