Tag Archives: michael lavigne

Review: The Wanting

thewanting From the 1970s Moscow to Israel in the 1990s, The Wanting, by Michael Lavigne, is an intense and complex story line.

There are three main characters in the book: Roman Guttman, Anna, his daughter, and a Palestinian man. Each one tells their own sad story, alternately. Each one has a yearning, a desire for a semblance of peace and understanding.

Roman’s Moscow is filled with the terrors of the time. His relationships and struggles within a time capsule of war, rivalry and hatred lingers throughout the novel. His daughter’s naivete turns into judgements that go against the grain of existence. The Palestinian, Amir Hamid, has a bitter perception regarding the Israelis, and his desire is to inflict damage and pain, at all costs, is a strong dynamic within the pages. Lavigne is brilliant in his masterful telling of the events that take place. Historically speaking, the facts are forthright and told with extremely vivid imagery.

The conflicts in Israel and Palestine are also masterfully depicted. The characters bring their own history and baggage to the complex situations. Daily life and the struggles to endure the social quandarys and conflicts are told with a sense of knowing, and a sense of sadness for the peace that seemingly can not be.

Events that define those who become involved in suicide bombing are explored in depth through those who foster the desire to participate. We are given glimpses of issues that lead up to the suicidal moments. We are privy to the after effects and affects of the horrendous action upon others. Emotions run rampant, on both sides of the conflict. For some, emotional aspects are not necessarily shown from the beginning of the story line. They are slowly gained through crises after crises, and eye-opening moments.

Each side is victim to the whims of conflict. Not victim in the sense of one harmed, but victim in the desire to murder without forethought for the welfare of humanity. Each side is guilty of repression and harm.

The human struggle with each other’s culture and traditions are depicted vividly, and often times extremely harshly. The warring factions and their modes of engulfing others within their grasp are well told and defined. Lavigne is a master story teller, and at the core of The Wanting is a desire for peace, for the ceasing of the continuing issues of war, for a blending of two cultures in harmony.

The story encompasses not only the desire for peace, but also a desire for spiritual understanding and acceptance, acceptance respect for each other in the realm of religion. If we can be accepting, then the issue of a peaceful society is possible.

This is not to say that Lavigne is not cognizant of the issues at the forefront between Israel and Palestine. On the contrary, he is most definitely aware, and the novel displays that in every aspect, with sensitivity. He also brings a huge sense of sadness to the unfolding events and occurrences within the pages. The Wanting is a story of sadness. The longing, yearning, WANTING, is a continual aspect within the pages, displayed without prejudice, through Michael Lavigne’s incredible writing.

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Filed under Fiction, Historical Fiction, Jewish History, Lorri's Blog, Novels

Lorri M. Review: Not Me

notme Not Me, by Michael Lavigne, is a compelling novel on so many levels. For me it was a metaphor for self identity, sin and change, and the superficial roles that one plays in order to move on with their life and flee from the consequences of their actions.

Not Me is a study in the father-son relationship, and is a unique Holocaust story. Within the pages, their relationship is redefined. The father and son relationship is explored with intensity.

Heshel Rosenheim, suffering from Alzheimer’s, is Michael’s father. While Michael is caring for his father, he is handed some old journals/diaries written by his father that will alter the course of his (Michael’s) life, life and family history as he knew it.

Heshel has been living as a Holocaust survivor since the end of World War II. His journals tell otherwise. And, this, is the root of the reality, upon which Michael has been handed. The foundation of his life has been shattered.

Heshel, a man whose cowardly acts could not be suppressed by running from the truth of his actions, is seeking consolation of some sort from his son. He wants Michael to learn the facts, after all of these years of hiding them from him. The quandary resulting from Michael’s reading the journals is cemented.

Heshel learned that fleeing only negates the truth, which followed him everywhere he went. Within the context of the self identity are the themes of love, loss, forgiveness and redemption. The blur between forgiveness and redemption is obvious in the way Lavigne writes.

Michael is rent between his new found knowledge and his love for his father. He is a man who is floundering. He is divided between the truth and the superficiality of his childhood. He is torn between who he truly is and what he is. Does the truth negate who we actually are, have become through living, or thought we were? This is a question the reader is exposed to.

It is a book that is fascinating, compelling, insightful, poignant and comical, and one that I highly recommend.

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Filed under Book Reviews, Fiction, Holocaust/Genocide, Judaism, Lorri's Blog, Novels